Spotting the Warning Signs of Substance Abuse

Substance abuse describes a harmful pattern of using specific substances that alter your mood. These substances can vary from legal or illicit drugs and alcohol to things that aren’t drugs at all, like inhalants and solvents.

Unfortunately, when you abuse substances, it can significantly affect your life and cause a variety of complications, including:

If you need help spotting the warning signs of substance abuse, our experienced team at 2nd Chance Treatment Center, can help. With our personalized approach to treating substance abuse and addiction, we can help you identify the signs of a problem so you can start your journey towards sobriety today.

Substance use versus substance abuse

It can be hard to know when someone is “using” substances versus “abusing” substances. In fact, people often wonder if having a drink or two each day qualifies as substance abuse. 

Unfortunately, the answer to that question varies from person to person because everyone has their own personal risks of developing a substance abuse disorder. 

A substance abuse disorder, or addiction, involves your brain chemistry. This complex condition interferes with your self-control and ability to stop using certain substances, even if they’re harmful to you. 

If you have a substance abuse disorder, it causes an intense focus on both getting and using the specific substance that makes you feel good. That’s because using the substance triggers chemical changes in your brain that create a sense of euphoria. But with continued use, you need to keep taking -- or even using more of -- the substance to feel normal or good. 

When you have a substance abuse problem, you also experience brain changes that interfere with your self-control and ability to stop using certain substances. That’s because the substance impacts the specific regions of your brain associated with judgment, learning, decision-making, memory, and impulse control. 

While anyone can develop a substance abuse disorder, your chances are higher if you have another mental health disorder -- like depression or anxiety -- or a family history of addiction. Your risk also increases if you’ve lived with poverty, abuse, or neglect.

Signs of substance abuse

If you or someone you know has a substance abuse problem, it’s common to see a variety of symptoms, including:

A substance abuse disorder or addiction can also make it increasingly hard to function without the specific substance. You can even experience intense cravings or physical symptoms of withdrawal when you try to stop.

If you or someone you know has a substance abuse disorder, we can help you recover and maintain sobriety. We use a variety of treatments customized to your unique needs, including medications that help control your cravings and withdrawal symptoms, along with therapy to help support your recovery.

For more information on the warning signs of substance abuse, call us at 2nd Chance Treatment Center or schedule an appointment online today.

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